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Black Beard's Vienna Lager Recipe Kit

Black Beard's Vienna Lager Recipe Kit

Item Number:k99-0186
Your Price:$34.99

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Black Beard's Vienna Lager Recipe Kit

An Amber colored Vienna Lager is sure to make you the scourge of the sea. The combination of Munich and Vienna malts offer this beer a nice malty, almost nutty backbone. The Victory malt brings a subtle biscuit aroma and flavor while the Tettnang hops provide a nice floral hop character.

Yield: 5 Gallons
Original Gravity: 1.059
Final Gravity: 1.015
Color / SRM : 18.18
Alcohol by Volume: 5.72%
IBU (anticipated, alpha acids can fluctuate): 28

Specialty Grains: Vienna, Victory, Crystal 120L, Amber
Hops: Tettnang

Recipe Includes : Liquid Malt, Specialty Grains in a grain bag & Hops

  Edward Teach: lived between 1680 and 1718.  He was better known as Blackbeard, the notorious English pirate who sailed and marauded in the West Indies and the eastern coast of the American Colonies.  He was probably born in Bristol, England. Probably a sailor on ships during Queen Anne's War before settling on the Bahamas. Which was a base for Captain Benjamin Hornigold, whose crew Teach joined sometime around 1716. 

Hornigold placed him in command of a sloop he had captured, and the two engaged in numerous acts of piracy. Their numbers were boosted by the addition to their fleet of two more ships, one of which was commanded by Stede Bonnet, but toward the end of 1717 Hornigold retired from piracy, taking two vessels with him.

Blackbeard captured a French merchant vessel, which he renamed The Queen Anne's Revenge.  He equipped her with 40 guns and became a feared pirate. He was reported to have tied lit fuses under his hat to frighten his enemies.

After he ran the Queen Anne's Revenge aground near Beaufort, North Carolina, he settled in Bath Town.  There he accepted a royal pardon. But he was soon back at sea, where he attracted the attention of Alexander Spotswood, the Governor of Virginia. Spotswood arranged for a party of soldiers and sailors to try to capture the pirate, which they did on 22 November 1718. During a ferocious battle, Teach and several of his crew were killed by a small force of sailors led by Lieutenant Robert Maynard.

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